Manslaughter

Fort Bend County Manslaughter Attorney

Under Chapter 19 of the Texas Penal Code, criminal homicide is defined as the intentional, knowing, reckless or negligent causing of death of an individual. This, however, can be further categorized into four different types of crimes—including murder, capital murder, manslaughter, and criminally negligent homicide. Manslaughter is defined under §19.04 as recklessly causing the death of another individual and is tried as a second-degree felony. The penalties for felonies of the second degree include imprisonment in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice for a term between two and twenty years. In addition to incarceration, the defendant will also face a monetary fine that will not exceed $20,000.

Difference Between Manslaughter and Murder

Often, manslaughter and murder are put into the same mental category—the truth, however, is that these are two very different types of criminal charges. While both are criminal homicide, only one is committed through reckless actions instead of intentional, knowing actions. In most cases, if defendant was charged with murder, the defense will attempt to convince the jury to reduce the charges to manslaughter, which carries far less severe penalties. Some things that could be an example of "recklessly" causing the death of another would be getting drunk and playing with a gun that is fully loaded. Because it was not done negligently, but rather recklessly, it would not be considered criminally negligent homicide—still, the defendant did not intentionally mean to cause another's death and the charges may be reduced.

Defending Charges of Manslaughter in Fort Bend

By working with an experienced Fort Bend County criminal defense attorney, you can take the necessary steps toward protecting your innocence. Several defenses can be levied on your behalf. For example, it could be argued that you were acting in self-defense, that it was a complete accident, or even that you were falsely accused and are actually innocent. In some cases, you may be able to argue that the prosecution has insufficient evidence; this is important because the burden of proof rests with prosecution—since it is more difficult to prove something didn't happen than to prove it did.

As a criminal lawyer, I draw heavily on my experience as a former senior prosecutor of a felony District Court in Texas. During my time there, I worked on several violent crime cases and have hands-on experience with how the other side works. I am able to bring this full-bodied knowledge to every case that I work on and use it to the benefit of my clients; I thoroughly investigate and negotiate every case. Regardless of whether I am seeking to get charges acquitted, lowered, or other, my clients can trust that I will go above and beyond in my efforts to protect their legal rights.

Contact my firm today for relentless criminal defense.